Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Vegan

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Most people don’t know that our contemporary customs at Thanksgiving, namely the serving of turkeys, were shaped and popularized by a magazine editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, in the mid-1800s. Whatever meaning we attribute to this Thanksgiving holiday is most certainly not lost (in fact, it is enhanced) by creating food-based rituals that affirm rather than take life, that demonstrate compassion and empathy rather than selfishness and gluttony, that celebrate the fact that no one need be sacrificed in order that we should eat. In today’s episode, I offer a number of different menus for a beautiful holiday feast that delights the senses and reflects our values.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT' BEST PODCAST IN VEGNEWS MAGAZINE AWARDS AGAIN IN 2017

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT: www.Patreon.com/ColleenPatrickGoudreau

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If you’ve never met them, turkeys are magnificent animals, full of spunk and spark and affection. I’ve introduced many people to the critters at farmed animal sanctuaries, and the animals with whom people have the most transformative experience are the turkeys. Every time. Never fails. Join me as I tell some stories of special turkeys I’ve had the privilege of meeting and as I explain why I’m still making amends to the animals, whose breasts, legs, and wings used to darken my dinner plate.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT' BEST PODCAST IN VEGNEWS MAGAZINE AWARDS AGAIN IN 2017

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT'. HELP IT GO ANOTHER 13 YEARS: Patreon.com/ColleenPatrickGoudreau

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Lack of awareness and cognitive dissonance compels us to support industries that exploit and hurt animals for our own entertainment both when we’re at home (like going to the zoo or circus) and when we travel (like swimming with dolphins, getting photographed with tigers, or riding elephants). Our desire to be close to other animals and interact with them is exactly what causes them the most harm. Most of us are drawn to animals, and that’s a good thing, because it also means we want to help them and protect them, but it’s a bad thing when our desire to interact with them is at the cost of their own welfare, safety, happiness, or lives. Listen to today's episode about how to travel to Thailand without harming animals.

Don't forget to subscribe to Food for Thought and Animalogy podcasts on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play. Thank you to everyone who supports this work. Become a patron today.


I discovered an ancient story about justice brought to an abused horse, then found out it was turned into a poem by a well-known American poet in the 19th century. Then I discovered that poem was made into a film by a humane education organization, founded by an ordinary citizen who (after learning about animal abuse) devoted his life to abolishing cruelty to animals. At the same time, he was inspired by a bestselling novel written also by an ordinary citizen concerned about animal abuse; said organization founder sponsored a writing contest for another work of fiction that would highlight animal cruelty for the public, which also became a bestseller. Join me as I share these connections with you to hopefully inspire YOU to use your voice, use your skills, use your gifts to raise awareness, help animals, and inspire others.


We have many words built from the English word for “bear,” the Latin word for “bear,” and the Greek word for “bear,” and we have many expressions and phrases built from the same furry animal. Of course there are also expressions using the verb “to bear,” as in “to carry,” such as in “bearing fruit, bearing a child, or bearing a burden or a grudge. Let’s explore the origins of all of these.


The first animal anti-cruelty law in the United States was passed in 1867, and though there is much work to be done, much work has been done to protect animals under the law since then. Join me today for my conversation with Stephen Wells, executive director for the Animal Legal Defense Fund, as we talk about the legal definition of animals as "property," legal victories secured for animals, and how this field has grown significantly over the decades, reflecting a shift in public opinion. 

Visit ALDF.org

Visit ColleenPatrickGoudreau.com


They said we'd starve being vegan in southern Germany. They said we'd starve being vegan in Rwanda. They said we'd starve in the Highlands. They were wrong, and we lived to tell about it. Join me on our latest excursion — this time on a 100-mile trek from Glasgow to Fort William (and a train ride to Edinburgh). I take you with us from how to pack for such a trip, what my favorite vegan hiking shoes are, what company to use to book with, how to prepare for eating while you're walking 15 miles a day, and how often to stop for whisky. Complete with recommendations, resources, and restaurants. 

Thanks to listener supporters, who also receive written transcripts of each episode.   


Just because you don't consider yourself a "gardener" doesn't mean this episode isn't for you. Humane gardening is about looking through the lens of the millions of species on this planet and creating a space that enables them to thrive. It's about coexisting with rather than managing or controlling wildlife. With the help of Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener: Nurturing a Backyard Habitat for Wildlife, you can apply this concept in your own garden patch, on your apartment balcony, or as part of policy you create with city officials. In this episode, Nancy and I chat about:

*how to help pollinators (and that doesn't just mean honeybees)

 

*what to do when you have uninvited critters in your attic

*how to plant for maximum wildlife (hint: NATIVES!)

*why preventing deer, plant-eating animals, from eating plants, makes no sense

*why you may want to rethink birdfeeders (and plant natives instead)

*how you can prevent your dog from getting skunked

-how you can get on the public relations team for wildlife

and so much more! Enjoy, please share, and be sure to follow Nancy at humanegardener.com.

Thank you to supporters for making this podcast possible. 

 


“What would happen to all the animals if we stopped eating them? Wouldn’t we be overrun with cows and pigs and chickens if we stopped?” “If everyone stopped eating these animals, they would go extinct. Is that what you want, Ms. Vegan and Mr. Vegan? You don’t care if these animals go extinct??” Join me today as I address these questions. 

 

Thanks to supporters for making Food for Thought possible and who receive written transcripts of every episode.


I believe that shifting the way we talk about, think about, and behave towards other animals will impact them positively in the long term. But I also believe that as people who care about animals, we need to be politically engaged, because it’s not enough to change hearts and minds; we also have to change laws in order to protect animals from violence and exploitation. If you're looking to become empowered and emboldened to be a voice for animals, this is the episode for you.

Thank you for your support. Supporters receive transcripts of episodes.