Categories

Food, Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Nutrition, Food, Health, Society & Culture, News & Politics
Literature, Food, Health, Society & Culture, News & Politics
Literature, Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Health, Food, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics, Food
general
Health, Food, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Food, Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics
Food, Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics

Syndication


Archives


Keyword Search



December 2017
S M T W T F S
     
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
May
April
February
January

December
November
June
April
March
January

October
August
July
June
May
April
March
February

December
November
October
August
July
June
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March

They said we'd starve being vegan in southern Germany. They said we'd starve being vegan in Rwanda. They said we'd starve in the Highlands. They were wrong, and we lived to tell about it. Join me on our latest excursion — this time on a 100-mile trek from Glasgow to Fort William (and a train ride to Edinburgh). I take you with us from how to pack for such a trip, what my favorite vegan hiking shoes are, what company to use to book with, how to prepare for eating while you're walking 15 miles a day, and how often to stop for whisky. Complete with recommendations, resources, and restaurants. 

Thanks to listener supporters, who also receive written transcripts of each episode.   

Comments[0]

Just because you don't consider yourself a "gardener" doesn't mean this episode isn't for you. Humane gardening is about looking through the lens of the millions of species on this planet and creating a space that enables them to thrive. It's about coexisting with rather than managing or controlling wildlife. With the help of Nancy Lawson, author of The Humane Gardener: Nurturing a Backyard Habitat for Wildlife, you can apply this concept in your own garden patch, on your apartment balcony, or as part of policy you create with city officials. In this episode, Nancy and I chat about:

*how to help pollinators (and that doesn't just mean honeybees)

 

*what to do when you have uninvited critters in your attic

*how to plant for maximum wildlife (hint: NATIVES!)

*why preventing deer, plant-eating animals, from eating plants, makes no sense

*why you may want to rethink birdfeeders (and plant natives instead)

*how you can prevent your dog from getting skunked

-how you can get on the public relations team for wildlife

and so much more! Enjoy, please share, and be sure to follow Nancy at humanegardener.com.

Thank you to supporters for making this podcast possible. 

 

Comments[0]

“What would happen to all the animals if we stopped eating them? Wouldn’t we be overrun with cows and pigs and chickens if we stopped?” “If everyone stopped eating these animals, they would go extinct. Is that what you want, Ms. Vegan and Mr. Vegan? You don’t care if these animals go extinct??” Join me today as I address these questions. 

 

Thanks to supporters for making Food for Thought possible and who receive written transcripts of every episode.

Comments[0]

I believe that shifting the way we talk about, think about, and behave towards other animals will impact them positively in the long term. But I also believe that as people who care about animals, we need to be politically engaged, because it’s not enough to change hearts and minds; we also have to change laws in order to protect animals from violence and exploitation. If you're looking to become empowered and emboldened to be a voice for animals, this is the episode for you.

Thank you for your support. Supporters receive transcripts of episodes. 

Comments[0]

Research has found that the way we name animals is intimately tied to our ability to eat them. Listen to this excerpt, then head over to Animalogy for the full episode. This topic is relevant for Food for Thought listeners, so I thought I'd put it on your radar. 

Subscribe to Animalogy Podcast wherever you listen to podcasts. Thank you!

Comments[0]

Because this episode from Animalogy Podcast is so relevant to what we discuss on Food for Thought Podcast, I'm sharing an excerpt with you. Listen to the full episode over at Animalogy Podcast in which I talk to my friend, colleague, and fellow activist Carol J. Adams about:

  • where the animals go when we eat meat
  • how the word meat has changed over the centuries
  • the effect of “zero plurals” (listen for what the heck that means)
  • the power of words to objectify, diminish, and dismember an individual

Thank you for listening to and supporting this work. 

Comments[0]

Having been to Rwanda, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, I can now share with you the details of our adventure. For information on what you need to do before visiting these countries, check out the Food for Thought episode called Planning and Preparing a Trip to Africa. But for what do to once you get there and how to make the most of it, sit back, and enjoy the journey. 

Supporters of Food for Thought receive the itinerary and specific details of the trip.

 

Comments[0]

SPECIAL EPISODE -- The Semantics of Meat (with Paul Shapiro)

Easing you into the new ANIMALOGY podcast, enjoy this SPECIAL episode, and be sure to subscribe to ANIMALOGY today on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcasts. 

Semantics play a significant role in shaping public perception about animals and animal welfare. The meat, dairy, and egg industries go to great lengths to remove harsh terminology and replace it with euphemisms that conceal the truth and sanitize violence. In today’s episode, I talk to someone who knows this all too well: Paul Shapiro, Vice President of Policy at The Humane Society of the United States. Join us as we discuss euphemisms and doublespeak used by animal agriculture and the best terms for plant-based and cultured meat. 

Please subscribe to Animalogy on iTunes and Stitcher, download the episodes, and leave a review. Thank you for helping change the way we talk — and think — about animals.

Direct download: fft_paul.mp3
Category:Food, Health, Society & Culture, Fitness & Nutrition, News & Politics -- posted at: 6:01pm PST
Comments[0]

11-Year Anniversary: Another Amazing Love Fest!

Help celebrate the ELEVEN-YEAR ANNIVERSARY of the Food for Thought podcast by sitting back and taking in the love letters I’ve received from listeners and supporters this past year. The stories are as diverse as the listeners and reflect varied ages and backgrounds, but they all share common threads of hope, transformation, and compassion. I

hope you are as moved by the letters as I am humbled by them. If you ever once thought that “people don’t change,” then you’re in for quite a treat. And grab some tea or a glass of wine. 

Thank you for all your support and love these last 11 years!

Comments[0]

SPECIAL EPISODE — Eating Crow? Trying Eating Humble Pie Instead.

Easing you into the new podcast, enjoy this episode of ANIMALOGY, and be sure to subscribe to ANIMALOGY today on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcasts. 

If you’ve made a serious faux pas and need to acknowledge it with humility, you might be said to be “eating crow” or “eating humble pie,” both phrases of which involve animals — or do they? In this episode, I uncover the dirty little secret underneath the pastry dough in “to eat humble pie” but demonstrate why you still want to eat humble pie (or dirt) instead of crows. 

Please subscribe to Animalogy on iTunes and Stitcher, download the episodes, and leave a review. Thank you for helping change the way we talk — and think — about animals.

Comments[0]