Food for Thought: The Joys and Benefits of Living Compassionately and Healthfully (In Other Words: Vegan)

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May 2015
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There is a prevailing myth in our culture, played out in our language and in marketing, that meat is masculine and plant foods are for wimps. Meat is a metaphor for strength, virility, and manliness, while vegetarianism/veganism is feminine, effeminate, and even emasculating. "Real Men Eat Meat" and "Tofu is Gay Meat" are just two examples of advertisements that perpetuate this myth and secure it in our consciousness. Studies show it's working. Join me for a meaty episode that will shake you out of your vegetative state. If you don't want to be a fruit, learn how you can be a beefcake. 

Thank you to listener supporters and our sponsors The American Antivivisection Society and Nature's Food. (Shop for Nature's Food at GNC.com and receive $5 when you use the promo code 26381.)

Listen by subscribing to the RSS feed or listening through iTunesStitcher, or Soundcloud.

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When it comes to human and non-human animals, we are more alike than different, especially when it comes to mothering. In today's special episode, I share my thoughts about what it means to be a great mom and why elephants and alligators both meet the criteria.

Thank you to listener supporters and our sponsors The American Antivivisection Society and Nature's Food. (Shop for Nature's Food at GNC.com and receive $5 when you use the promo code 26381.)

Listen by subscribing to the RSS feed or listening through iTunes,Stitcher, or Soundcloud.

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Returning to the 10 Stages of What Happens When You Stop Eating Animals, today we wrap up Stage 7: Effective Communication. In Part One, I covered our first five strategies:

*Creating Intention
*Practicing Active Listening
*Asking Questions
*Having a Sense of Humor
*Knowing Where You End and Another Person Begins

In Part Two, I offer five more strategies to help us communicate unapologetically, respectfully, productively, compassionately, and effectively. 

Thank you to listener supporters and our sponsors The American Antivivisection Society and Nature's Food. (Shop for Nature's Food at GNC.com and receive $5 when you use the promo code 26381.)

Listen by subscribing to the RSS feed or listening through iTunesStitcher, or Soundcloud.


Returning to our 10 Stages of What Happens When You Stop Eating Animals, today we tackle Stage 7: Effective Communication. This is the stage at which you begin to feel more comfortable in your own vegan skin, including how to speak to people who push back when you tell them you’re vegan or who are hostile or passive aggressive or disrespectful. You learn the importance of finding your voice and of being unapologetic about living compassionately and healthfully. Today is only PART ONE of 10 strategies for effective communication skills to be the best ambassador of compassion and wellness.

Today's supporters include listeners like you, as well as

The American Antivivisection Society

and

Piedmont Farm Animal Refuge


Often when you tell someone you’re vegan, the response is: “Why are you vegan? Is it for health or ethics?” Somehow, the answer matters, and depending on your answer, people respond differently. Join me as I discuss if our motivation to become vegan affects our dedication to remain vegan. I also share my opinion about people who identify as "plant-based" rather than "vegan."

Thank you to listeners and to the American Anti-Vivisection Society (aavs.org) for their support of the podcast.


The idea of not meeting a deadline or being late for an appointment or letting someone down is the stuff of nightmares for me. Traveling with The 30-Day Vegan Challenge and speaking all around the country made it impossible for me to release this week's podcast episode. That's all you need to know, but if you want to listen to my adventures at the Natural Food Expo and my misadventures in FL and Mexico, take a listen. Regular podcast schedule resumes on March 29th! 


One misconception about veganism I’ve encountered more than once is the assumption that in honoring our values, we must forego tradition - as if these two things are mutually exclusive. Food-related rituals, particularly those involving animals, are likely to be so revered that they supersede consideration for anything or anyone else. Join me today for a discussion of how to honor the traditions of Easter and Passover while staying true to our values.

 

Thank you to listener sponsors as well as The American Anti-Vivisection Society.

 

 


A small subset of opinionated, passionate, well-intentioned people perpetuate the stereotype of the angry, self-righteous, perfection-focused animal rights vegan when they spew invective at anyone who is not "vegan enough" in their eyes. They are otherwise known as The Vegan Police. Listen to today's episode for my perspective on how we can speak up for animals -- online and in person -- without alienating people who are trying to make compassionate choices. 

*You can listen via by subscribing to the RSS feed or listening through iTunes, Stitcher, or Soundcloud.

*Support the Food for Thought podcast

*Music by Gosta Berling

*Take The 30-Day Vegan Challenge!

*Today's Sponsor: American Anti-Vivisection Society


When you look at the arc of history in terms of human violence against animals, there is no doubt that things are significantly better than they were in the past. We've still got a lot of work to to, but when we step back and look at it from a broader perspective, we can see the paradigm shifts that took place in terms of how we regard and treat animals. One of those shifts can be traced back to what is called The Age of Enlightenment, and that's what we explore today.

 

*Today's Sponsor: American Anti-Vivisection Society

*Listen and Comment at JoyfulVegan.com

*Subscribe to Food for Thought Feed

*Support the Podcast 

*Music by Gosta Berling


Many of us happen upon wildlife in distress in our daily lives, but we don't often do anything about it. We may be afraid, we may not know what to do, we may be too busy. Today I share my brief story about a little raccoon with distemper whose suffering took precedence over my fear.

Today's Tweetable: "One life matters - especially to the one whose life it is." Please share and tag @JoyfulVegan

For more information, visit JoyfulVegan.com.