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November 2017
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WARNING: Radical ideas fill this episode, centering around the suggestion that we try to have compassion for people with whom we disagree or who participate in behavior we find abhorrent. That’s the thing about compassion: it’s gotta be equal opportunity or it’s just inauthentic. It’s easy to be compassionate towards like-minded people; the challenge is choosing to have compassion towards those with whom we disagree. Check out this episode for tips and suggestions on communicating with compassion – but only if you want to create change in the world.

SUPPORTERS MAKE THIS PODCAST POSSIBLE: www.patreon.com/colleenpatrickgoudreau

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Most people don’t know that our contemporary customs at Thanksgiving, namely the serving of turkeys, were shaped and popularized by a magazine editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, in the mid-1800s. Whatever meaning we attribute to this Thanksgiving holiday is most certainly not lost (in fact, it is enhanced) by creating food-based rituals that affirm rather than take life, that demonstrate compassion and empathy rather than selfishness and gluttony, that celebrate the fact that no one need be sacrificed in order that we should eat. In today’s episode, I offer a number of different menus for a beautiful holiday feast that delights the senses and reflects our values.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT' BEST PODCAST IN VEGNEWS MAGAZINE AWARDS AGAIN IN 2017

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT: www.Patreon.com/ColleenPatrickGoudreau

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If you’ve never met them, turkeys are magnificent animals, full of spunk and spark and affection. I’ve introduced many people to the critters at farmed animal sanctuaries, and the animals with whom people have the most transformative experience are the turkeys. Every time. Never fails. Join me as I tell some stories of special turkeys I’ve had the privilege of meeting and as I explain why I’m still making amends to the animals, whose breasts, legs, and wings used to darken my dinner plate.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT' BEST PODCAST IN VEGNEWS MAGAZINE AWARDS AGAIN IN 2017

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING 'FOOD FOR THOUGHT'. HELP IT GO ANOTHER 13 YEARS: Patreon.com/ColleenPatrickGoudreau

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Lack of awareness and cognitive dissonance compels us to support industries that exploit and hurt animals for our own entertainment both when we’re at home (like going to the zoo or circus) and when we travel (like swimming with dolphins, getting photographed with tigers, or riding elephants). Our desire to be close to other animals and interact with them is exactly what causes them the most harm. Most of us are drawn to animals, and that’s a good thing, because it also means we want to help them and protect them, but it’s a bad thing when our desire to interact with them is at the cost of their own welfare, safety, happiness, or lives. Listen to today's episode about how to travel to Thailand without harming animals.

Don't forget to subscribe to Food for Thought and Animalogy podcasts on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play. Thank you to everyone who supports this work. Become a patron today.


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